Oct 122007
 

::iimageright(“reject67.gif”,”reject67″):: Have you seen the TV ad with the young lady talking about how the insurance companies “killed” her dad, the firefighter, by denying his claim? Did it pull at your heartstrings? What if you found out the whole thing was false? That the referendum would have no impact on this situation?

In what way is it deceptive? According to the Reject67.org web site:

  • The case involves a suit against the City of Puyallup, which is responsible for both the health care and workers’ compensation claims for city employees. Self-insured entities, like the City of Puyallup, are not covered by Referendum 67.
  • Despite the ad’s claim, all health care costs were paid without delay. Puyallup Mayor Michael Deal wrote to the legislature earlier this year that Battalion Chief David Potter “never went without coverage or treatment—ever.” To be covered under Referendum 67 a claim must be denied, but there was never a denial of coverage.
  • All decisions about treatment were made by the Chief’s doctors, not the City of Puyallup or any other insurer. Unfortunately, the Chief never received a bone marrow transplant because “His condition never improved to the level his doctors said he needed,” Mayor Deal wrote.

It is sad that the man died. But it is false advertising to say that he died because of anything an insurance company did or did not do. If the proponents of R-67 can’t win using facts, maybe they should not win. Have you seen the TV ad with the young lady talking about how the insurance companies “killed” her dad, the firefighter, by denying his claim? Did it pull at your heartstrings? What if you found out the whole thing was false? That the referendum would have no impact on any similar situation?

In what way is it deceptive? According to the Reject67.org web site:

  • The case involves a suit against the City of Puyallup, which is responsible for both the health care and workers’ compensation claims for city employees. Self-insured entities, like the City of Puyallup, are not covered by Referendum 67.
  • Despite the ad’s claim, all health care costs were paid without delay. Puyallup Mayor Michael Deal wrote to the legislature earlier this year that Battalion Chief David Potter “never went without coverage or treatment—ever.” To be covered under Referendum 67 a claim must be denied, but there was never a denial of coverage.
  • All decisions about treatment were made by the Chief’s doctors, not the City of Puyallup or any other insurer. Unfortunately, the Chief never received a bone marrow transplant because “His condition never improved to the level his doctors said he needed,” Mayor Deal wrote.

It is sad that the man died. But it is false advertising to say that he died because of anything an insurance company did or did not do. If the proponents of R-67 can’t win on using facts, maybe they should not win.

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